Stephen Jackson recently wrote an article for examiner.com, titled “Influential DC associations raise alarm on U.S. workforce skill gaps.”  The piece discusses recent research detailing the ill-preparedness of the U.S. workforce – and highlights the study prepared by Corporate Voices for Working Families and three other organizations.
Here’s an excerpt from Jackson’s article:
Earlier this summer a report highlighting the struggle U.S. employers are having finding new hires having the necessary basic and applied skills reflects the fact that employer-sponsored training is not up to the challenge. The report called, The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce; Exploring the Challenges of Employer-Provided Workforce Readiness Training was jointly produced by local associations, the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD), the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) – both of Old Town Alexandria – and the Corporate Voices for Working Families in Washington DC. The Conference Board headquartered in New York also participated.

American business and workers, more than ever, must be able to adapt to a rapidly changing marketplace in order to succeed. Demand in the U.S. for educated and skilled workers is rapidly exceeding the supply – from nurses to technicians to engineers. To compete and succeed in an international marketplace for talent, U.S. workers need a 21st century approach to lifelong learning that enables them to develop and refresh the skills needed for high-skilled service and manufacturing jobs. We must call for the development of a modernized, streamlined, and effective system that provides universal access to workforce training to maintain a nimble and productive workforce. The United States needs a strong education system and lifelong learning opportunities to prepare today’s workers as well as the next generation of workers for the ever-changing economy.
The specifics of The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce report conducted by Corporate Voices for Working Families, as well as other information on this topic can be found in the Workforce Readiness section of the Corporate Voices website.
Publications, research studies and toolkits on a host of work/life and work and family balance issues are also available on the Corporate Voices Web site.

Stephen Jackson recently wrote an article for examiner.com, titled “Influential DC associations raise alarm on U.S. workforce skill gaps.”  The piece discusses recent research detailing the ill-preparedness of the U.S. workforce – and highlights the study prepared by Corporate Voices for Working Families and three other organizations.

Here’s an excerpt from Jackson’s article:

Earlier this summer a report highlighting the struggle U.S. employers are having finding new hires having the necessary basic and applied skills reflects the fact that employer-sponsored training is not up to the challenge. The report, “The Ill-Prepared U.S. Workforce: Exploring the Challenges of Employer-Provided Workforce Readiness Training,” was jointly produced by local associations, the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD), the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) – both of Old Town Alexandria – and the Corporate Voices for Working Families in Washington DC. The Conference Board headquartered in New York also participated.

American business and workers, more than ever, must be able to adapt to a rapidly changing marketplace in order to succeed. Demand in the U.S. for educated and skilled workers is rapidly exceeding the supply – from nurses to technicians to engineers. To compete and succeed in an international marketplace for talent, U.S. workers need a 21st century approach to lifelong learning that enables them to develop and refresh the skills needed for high-skilled service and manufacturing jobs. We must call for the development of a modernized, streamlined, and effective system that provides universal access to workforce training to maintain a nimble and productive workforce. The United States needs a strong education system and lifelong learning opportunities to prepare today’s workers as well as the next generation of workers for the ever-changing economy.

Publications, research studies and toolkits on a host of other workforce readiness, flexibility, family economic stability, and work and family balance issues are also available on the Corporate Voices Web site.

By Allison Porton